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Understanding TV in the age of streaming and 'too much television'

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"There's too much television," said FX CEO John Landgraf at the Television Critics Association summer press tour. Landgraf, who is in part responsible for the success of shows like Fargo, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Archer, and The Americans, painted a landscape in which a mountain of good programs impede a wandering audience from discovering the truly great shows. Landgraf has firsthand experience: FX alone produces the aforementioned critical hits, along with The Strain, American Horrors Story, Louie, the upcoming American Crime Story, and plenty of other shows. And that's just one cable channel. Today, Landgraf and his peers compete in a battle royal of network, cable, premium, and streaming series, along with additional media like video games and YouTube videos.

To break down what TV has become, I invited The Verge's entertainment editor Emily Yoshida to the show. I've been following her reporting on television long before we began working together, and she does an excellent job of keeping Landgraf's claim and the changing world of television in perspective.

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