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Microsoft's new foldable keyboard is designed for any mobile device

Microsoft originally created a universal keyboard for iOS, Android, and Windows back in September, and now the company is announcing a foldable version. The Microsoft Universal Foldable Keyboard (yes, that’s the full name) is similar to the original, with Bluetooth connectivity to work across multiple devices, and a lack of a dedicated Windows key. While the original wasn’t foldable, this new version folds up neatly with magnets to keep it closed if you’re carrying it in a bag alongside your device.

Microsoft has ditched dedicated function keys at the top of its latest universal keyboard, but there’s a function key for the usual audio controls, search functionality, and more. The keyboard can pair with two devices at a time and switch between them with one touch. While there’s also a lack of a neat stand for your tablet on phone, you do get the benefits of a lightweight keyboard and the ability to fold it away easily. I got a chance to try the new keyboard at Mobile World Congress today, and I think this might be my next tablet keyboard. Battery life is up to three months before you need to charge it again using the micro USB connector at the side. It’s very thin and the soft material feels like it would stick to a desk well without slipping away.

This feels like the perfect accessory for writing a few emails from your tablet or phone at a coffee shop while you’re on the go. Microsoft has always made great keyboards and mice for Windows-powered devices, and if the company continues to create good keyboards for iOS and Android then I’m going to find myself owning a lot of Microsoft keyboards in the near future.

Microsoft says the keyboard will cost $99.95 when it's released in July.


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