clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Microsoft to combat revenge porn across Bing, OneDrive, and Xbox Live

Microsoft is taking broad steps to eliminate revenge porn from its most popular services. Today the company published a blog post outlining its plans to "help put victims back in control of their images and their privacy." Moving forward, Microsoft says it will remove links to offending photos and videos from Bing search results whenever a victim notifies the company that they were posted without permission.

That won't eliminate them from the internet altogether — a related problem that Microsoft says will require cooperation across the industry to fix. But the company is going even further to erase revenge porn from services that it fully controls; intimate photos of someone shared without consent over OneDrive and Xbox Live will be permanently deleted from those services. Links and content that are deleted will be unavailable worldwide, as these enforcement policies are global and not just limited to a victim's home country.

A new web tool makes reporting instances of revenge porn easier for victims. It's available in English to start, with Microsoft vowing to include other languages over the coming weeks. "Our hope is that by helping to address requests and to remove these extremely personal photos and videos from our services, we can better support victims as they work to re-claim their privacy, and help to push just a little further in the fight against this despicable practice."