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Microsoft's Gabe Aul steps aside as the face of Windows 10 testing

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If you're familiar with Microsoft's Windows 10 testing and feedback efforts, you'll be familiar with Gabe Aul. He's the man that presses the red button to release Windows 10 test builds, and he's turned into his very own meme and the face of Windows 10 testing. While Aul, surprisingly, hasn't gotten fed up of dealing with the constant feedback around Windows 10, a recent role change means he's stepping away from being the face of Windows 10 testing.

"Even though I changed jobs, I wanted to keep managing the Windows Insider Program because I loved it so much," says Aul. "Over the past few months I've realized that I cannot give 100 percent to my main job on the Engineering Systems team, and also give 100 percent to the Windows Insider Program... So the time has come for me to pass the torch to a new leader for the program." Aul isn't leaving Microsoft, instead he'll continue to improve the company's engineering tools and processes. A new Windows Insider program leader will replace his public-facing role, and Dona Sarkar is taking over as the head of Microsoft's Windows Insider initiative.

Dona Sarkar

Sarkar has been at Microsoft for a number of years, and she originally worked on Blu-ray, Bluetooth, and Autoplay features for Windows Vista. Since then, Sarkar has worked on the search features for Windows 7 and Windows 8, and has recently been working on the HoloLens developer experience team. She has been "waiting for this job for 11 years."

Microsoft's Windows Insider initiative has been a huge success for the company, and the software maker has released 35 PC builds and 22 mobile builds so far. That's a big change from the 2 or 3 pre-release builds released during Windows 7 and Windows 8, and public testers have been intimately involved in the development of Windows for the first time in history. If you're interested in learning more about Microsoft's Windows 10 development, check out The Verge's profile of the team involved in building Windows 10.