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Panorama artist Zach Lieberman wrote his own software for an interactive light installation

The Panorama festival is happening in about a month, but it won't just be a place to see Kendrick Lamar and LCD Soundsystem without switching venues — it'll also be something of an interactive art gallery, where festivalgoers are encouraged not only to look at art, but to touch it. At least, that's what Zach Lieberman wants. He's a Brooklyn-based artist whose projects are largely dependent on human interaction. Lieberman is interested in something he calls "code poetics," or the idea that code is capable of behaving like poetry. Now, after spending some time in his studio, I think I understand what he's getting at.

"For me, it's a form of music"

At Panorama, Lieberman will be showing an installation called Reflection Study, which utilizes the properties of light, geometry, and Lieberman's own software to project unique designs onto any surface. The installation is composed of a light table with a camera set up above it, and dozens of pieces of plexiglass in various shapes and letters. As people move the plexiglass pieces over the light box, different formations will be projected onto a wall. These formations are imagined by a DIY software that analyzes data from the camera.

"For these kinds of projects I really love having them in a festival," Lieberman told The Verge. "Having them in a place where it's unexpected to encounter art... When I'm doing this animation, when I'm doing these software studies, for me, it's a form of music."

Lieberman isn't the only artist showcasing his work at Panorama. Six other digital installations designed to excite festivalgoers will be showcased at The Lab. The projects there range from a cotton candy theremin to an oversized phone screen, and all will excite anyone fascinated by technology and art. Panorama runs from July 22nd through the 24th at Randall's Island Park in New York City. Don't miss it.