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Watch Matt Damon grow up in supercut that spans 28 years

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Matt Damon!

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Matt Damon is one of those actors who has become one of the most recognizable and bankable stars in the movie industry. Because he’s worked in film for nearly three decades, he’s also an embodiment of time’s cruel indifference. Burger Fiction has put together a great 13-minute supercut of all the times Matt Damon appeared in film and television, capturing both his range of roles and maturation as a living organism.

The clip starts all the way back in 1988 with a young Matt Damon appearing in Mystic Pizza all the way to older, grizzled Matt Damon in this week’s movie Matt Damon Beats Up Bad Guys, or as the marketing materials call it, Jason Bourne. There are some great gems in his career: I'm especially fond of his work in science fiction films like Titan A.E., Elysium, and Interstellar, as well as Oscar dramas like Saving Private Ryan and True Grit.

The clip starts all the way back in 1988 with a young Matt Damon appearing in Mystic Pizza all the way to older, grizzled Matt Damon in this week’s movie Matt Damon Beats Up Bad Guys, or as the marketing materials call it, Jason Bourne. There are some great gems in his career: I'm especially fond of his work in science fiction films like Titan A.E., Elysium, and Interstellar, as well as Oscar dramas like Saving Private Ryan and True Grit.

However, what's the most fun about this supercut is the "Matt Damon was in that?" moments like in Will & Grace, Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, The MajesticThe Bernie Mac Show, Happy Feet 2, Eurotrip, and a bunch of others. It’s also fun to see what a varied career he’s had, going from slap-dash blockbusters such as The Brothers Grimm to critically acclaimed films such as Syriana and The Departed.

This is a cool video, in part because Damon's been acting for roughly the same length of time that I've been watching movies, and he's appeared in most of the high points throughout the last three decades. It’s humanizing to watch a celebrity age, a sort of unintentional reminder that all of us, celebs and non-celebs alike, are all on this same weird journey. Which I think was sort of the point of Interstellar, but I can’t be sure.