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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker is available to buy now, a few days earlier than expected

If you need a new Star Wars movie to watch at home

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Lucasfilm

On top of bringing Frozen 2 to Disney Plus three months early, Disney is also making Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker available to purchase a few days early.

The Rise of Skywalker is available to buy via digital retailers like iTunes and Amazon today; it was originally scheduled to be released on Tuesday, March 17th. The Rise of Skywalker will not be streaming on Disney Plus either today or Tuesday. A Lucasfilm representative told The Verge there is no update on a Disney Plus streaming date at this time.

Much like Frozen 2, Disney releasing The Rise of Skywalker earlier than expected is a smart business move for the company. More people are spending time at home due to the spread of the novel coronavirus, including kids, teens, and adults. Giving people a variety of titles to watch as they try to fill time could help Disney secure additional digital purchases and Disney Plus subscribers in the interim. Disney has delayed the theatrical releases for three of its films — Mulan, New Mutants, and Antlers. None of the films have new release dates at this time.

The real question now is whether The Rise of Skywalker is worth people’s time and money. Our critic said “there’s plenty of spectacle and space-fighting to keep The Rise of Skywalker entertaining,” adding that “minute to minute, it’s an enjoyable movie” and “at its brightest points, it captures Star Wars at its best.” But it’s not perfect.

“Abrams just hasn’t pared down the bombast enough to keep his story grounded — and with the trilogy at its end, it’s strange to be left with as many new questions as resolutions.”

Still, if you’re home and looking for time to kill, Star Wars is never a bad idea. The other Star Wars films are streaming on Disney Plus.

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