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Wyze’s new Band wearable and smart scale are available today

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Venturing into fitness with two affordable devices

Wyze

Wyze announced that both its Wyze Band fitness tracker featuring Alexa functionality and its Wyze Scale, its new connected weight scale, are available starting today. These fitness-focused devices are a departure for the company, which has focused on smart home tech like cameras, locks, and security sensors. Though, as you might have hoped, they both stick to Wyze’s tack for making tech that doesn’t cost much.

The Wyze Band wearable pictured above costs $25 plus shipping directly from Wyze (it’s launching on Amazon in April). The Band lets you control the Wyze devices you might already own instead of doing so by opening the app on your phone. It also has Alexa voice integration built in, so you can issue commands and queries or use it to control your smart home with your voice. And with it being a wearable and all, it can handle tracking some fitness-related metrics — including step, sleep, and heart-rate tracking.

Some other notable specs with the Wyze Band include its advertised 10-day battery life (it uses a proprietary USB charger), a sharp-looking OLED screen, and waterproofing up to 50 meters of depth.

Wyze

The Wyze Scale costs just $20 plus shipping, which is far less than most smart scales. This model can store weigh-in results locally, and when you have the Wyze app open on your phone, it will offload them to the app via Bluetooth. The Wyze Scale is powered by four AAA batteries, and Wyze claims that it can track heart rate and analyze your weight and body fat pattern. Up to eight people can use it, and the scale can automatically recognize who’s using it based on the metrics collected.

Perhaps the most appealing feature of the scale is that it supports integration with Apple Health and Google Fit on launch day. Wyze says that it’s working to bring Fitbit and Samsung Health compatibility to the scale soon.

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