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Dominic Toretto’s 1970 Dodge Charger from the Fast and Furious is now a Lego kit

All you need is a model train set to outrun

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Dominic Toretto’s 1970 Dodge Charger is one of the most iconic cars in the Fast and Furious franchise, and soon, it’ll be available as a Lego set.

The model is a part of Lego’s Technic line, which means that it won’t just look cool; it will also include some moving parts. The car comes decked out with a replica V8 engine and a bottle of NOS (nitrous oxide) in the back — which is important if your goal is to try to race a model train to really set up the mood of the first film.

Adding Dominic Toretto’s car (which, in case you’ve forgotten, is the one that he was scared to drive until he really needed to at the end of the first Fast and Furious movie) to the Lego family might seem odd. The Fast and Furious franchise isn’t exactly child-friendly: kids don’t even show up until the fifth movie.

And Lego does have some pretty strict company guidelines about what franchises it turns into sets. Back in 2012, Lego noted in response to a request to produce sets based on Joss Whedon’s fan-favorite TV series Firefly that the company “produces toys for children,” adding that “all LEGO products, regardless of age target, must be content-appropriate for this core audience.” That’s why as “cool as the Serenity model is, the Firefly TV show and Serenity film contain content that is not appropriate for our core target audience of children ages 6-11.”

If Firefly isn’t kid-friendly, it’s hard to see how Fast and Furious wouldn’t be, either. There’s drinking! And sex! And violence! And extremely good-bad dialogue! That’s why adults love the movies. On the other hand, there’s also an argument to be made that Fast and Furious is a series about the importance of family, of acceptance and loyalty. The franchise’s entire motto is “ride or die,” a phrase that I use daily to describe the friends in my life who I actually like instead of tolerate.

Still, Lego has clearly loosened up the restrictions over the years. The company made a Friends set to celebrate NBC’s beloved series. Friends also has drinking, sex, and good-bad dialogue. Plus, c’mon — Dominic Toretto’s 1970 Dodge Charger is dope. It slaps. I want it. I would also like a Lego version of Brian’s orange 1993 Toyota Supra, but the Charger is a good start for now.

The Charger is available to preorder on Lego’s website today, and it will be in stores on April 27th.

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