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This Yves Behar-designed smart weight trainer is the love child of Mirror and Tonal

It won’t ship until fall 2020, though

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As more people seek solutions for working out at home during the global measures to self-quarantine and social distance, another connected fitness equipment enters an increasingly crowded category. Forme Life, a smart mirror with a weight training system built in, combines the look of the reflective Mirror and the pulleys of Tonal, with a few other touches by industrial designer Yves Behar.

Similar to the Tonal, the Forme Life uses a hidden resistance system to simulate weight so you can perform push, pull, and lift exercises from various angles at various weights. (The company did not specify the maximum weight it can support.) According to CNN, Forme Life will also come with a few other accessories like a heart rate monitor and ankle straps for more movement varieties. When not in use, the arms tuck away behind the screen, and other accessories can be stored in a hidden compartment. And of course, this being a “connected” training system, it comes with classes you can stream and the machine will automatically adjust weights that are best suited to your fitness levels. You can set goals and decide whether you want to build muscle and endurance or get lean over time. The class offerings also include cardio, bodyweight workouts, barre, and yoga.

It’s a bit hard to tell based on the press photos, but Forme Life says it will display the on-screen instructors as life-size as possible so those working out at home can gauge their form. This is also similar to another connected fitness machine, Tempo, which uses Microsoft’s Azure Kinect to track user movements for form corrections. (Tempo offers weight training classes too, but employs traditional barbells and dumbbells that can be stored underneath the machine when not in use.)

The Forme Life is expected to launch in fall 2020 and will cost $149 a month for 39 months, which includes the hardware and content subscription. (That’s $5,811 if you don’t want to do the math; in comparison, Tonal’s 36-month financing plan, which includes the content subscription, totals to $5,360 when it’s paid off.) It’s certainly a beautiful-looking machine that combines the principles of everything out there in the connected fitness equipment world, but fall 2020 might be a long time away for those hoping to get their home workouts in while gyms across the United States remain closed from the pandemic.