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Apple pay equity and harassment organizer will leave the company after reaching a settlement

Cher Scarlett was involved in pay equity surveys and #AppleToo

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Cher Scarlett, an Apple engineer who helped organize pay equity surveys and anti-harassment / discrimination campaigns at the company, will be leaving the company and requesting the withdrawal of a complaint she made to the National Labor Relations Board (or NLRB), according to a report from Bloomberg. The software engineer announced on Twitter that Friday would be her last day at Apple. Scarlett’s lawyers told The Verge that she had reached a private settlement with the company, but she declined to provide details about the terms when asked by Bloomberg.

Scarlett is leaving voluntarily, according to Bloomberg, unlike some other organizers who were fired from the company after speaking out. During her time at Apple, she was reportedly accused of leaking information to the press by other employees, something that’s strongly discouraged by Apple leadership, and that she denies doing.

The charge she’s requested be withdrawn was filed in September, when Scarlett said that Apple had “engaged in coercive and suppressive activity that has enabled abuse and harassment of organizers of protected concerted activity,” according to Reuters. She made the complaint after she and others at the company struggled to conduct a pay equity survey for Apple employees, with the company repeatedly shutting down their attempts. Scarlett also told Reuters that Apple wouldn’t allow employees to create a Slack room to talk about pay equity.

Scarlett withdrawing her complaint won’t necessarily leave Apple in the clear — the company faces a number of other complaints, including ones alleging wrongful termination from other employees Scarlett worked with to organize the #AppleToo movement. #AppleToo aimed to get support for Apple employees who experienced discrimination or harassment if the company’s policies failed to provide it.

Scarlett’s lawyers told Bloomberg that they hoped the company’s employees would continue to organize, a sentiment echoed by other activists that are no longer with the company.