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HTC now lets you directly buy Vive repair parts through iFixit

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An already modular design gets easier to fix

vive space pirates

HTC has partnered with iFixit to make its Vive virtual reality systems more repairable, selling a list of screws, cables, adapters, and other standalone components directly to consumers. In a blog post, HTC says the move is aimed at helping people whose headsets are out of warranty or potentially no longer being sold. iFixit also offers repair guides for the original Vive, the Vive Pro, the original Vive controller, and the Vive Pro Eye.

HTC confirmed to The Verge that this is the first time consumers have been able to order many of these replacement parts directly. A few listings, like a $3.99 controller lanyard, wouldn’t be hard to find through other sellers. But VR headsets are specialized and niche devices, so if you want a replacement foam pad ($19.99) and set of headphones ($59.99) for your Vive audio strap, or you’ve lost the power adapter for your link box ($19.99), this is a lot more reliable than hunting for an unofficial replacement.

The Vive, first released in 2016, has always been a relatively modular headset compared to the Sony PlayStation VR or Oculus Rift and Quest lineup. HTC has released several upgrade kits with features like wireless streaming and eye tracking, some of which have been later integrated into standalone headset packages. (Its latest module is a lip tracker.) The consumer-focused Vive Cosmos — which iFixit doesn’t list an official guide for — comes in multiple variants with different swappable faceplates. The entire Vive ecosystem is built on top of Valve’s SteamVR, and some pieces are cross-compatible with the Valve Index. As HTC keeps building out its ecosystem, a home repair option seems like a natural fit for the brand.