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AMD just leaked its Nvidia RTX Voice competitor in a (now deleted) video

AMD just leaked its Nvidia RTX Voice competitor in a (now deleted) video

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A video announcing the feature was posted to YouTube but quickly deleted

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It’s currently unclear what AMD hardware (pictured) might be required to use the new feature.
It’s currently unclear what AMD hardware (pictured) might be required to use the new feature.
Image: AMD

AMD looks to be on the cusp of releasing a competitor to RTX Voice, a feature for Nvidia graphics cards that cancels out background noise when you’re on a call or otherwise using your mic. That’s according to a trailer that AMD posted to its YouTube channel (apparently in error), Tom’s Hardware reports. Thankfully, a copy of the trailer was downloaded before it was deleted by Reddit user u/zenobian and uploaded to the AMD subreddit. 

The leaked trailer suggests that AMD’s Noise Suppression feature will work very similarly to Nvidia’s RTX Voice (which has subsequently been rolled into Nvidia’s Broadcast app). It uses “a real-time deep learning algorithm” to offer “two-way noise-reduction” that filters background noise out of both outgoing and incoming microphone audio, and is apparently built into AMD’s existing Adrenalin software.

The big question is how well AMD’s noise suppression technology works in practice. Nvidia’s RTX Voice works so well it sometimes feels like magic, and when I’ve used it in the past it happily canceled out the sound of the clackiest of mechanical keyboards. AMD arguably needs to match features like these if it has any hope of overcoming its underdog status in the GPU market.

There’s no mention of when the feature might receive an official announcement, or what hardware will be required to make use of it. When Nvidia initially released its RTX Voice software, it seemed the AI-focused tensor cores found in its newer graphics cards were key to making it work. However, in later months Nvidia rolled out official support for the feature on far older cards that lacked the dedicated hardware. Here’s hoping AMD’s feature works across a similarly broad range of devices.

Representatives from AMD did not respond to The Verge’s request for comment.