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Circuit Breaker

Tiny1 camera wants to help you shoot the moon

The sky is the limit

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The Tiny1 is a camera from TinyMOS billing itself as the "world’s smallest astronomy camera". It uses a proprietary noise-reduction algorithm the company says will allow for improved image quality in low-light environments, and an augmented reality star map that can be overlaid on the touchscreen viewfinder to help identify stars and planets while you’re shooting. TinyMOS claims that these features will lead to better results than using your smartphone, but with a smaller form factor and more ease-of-use than a traditional full-size DSLR rig intended for astrophotography.

The camera can capture still images, 2.5K HD video, and time-lapses of the night sky with a 4 megapixel sensor. It uses a standard CS-mount lens system to allow most camera lenses or telescopes to be connected, provided you have the right adaptor (if you don’t, TinyMOS has them available as add-ons). It can also be used as a regular camera in daylight hours in a pinch, albeit one with lower specs than most modern-day smartphones. The Tiny1 also has built-in Wi-Fi, allowing for photo sharing to social networks directly from the camera, and can connect to Android phones for remote control.

The Tiny1 is up now on Indiegogo, with pre-orders going for $399 for a kit of the Tiny1 camera and a 2.8mm F1.4 wide-angle lens. If you’re hoping to take it out on a summer camping trip though, you’ll likely have to wait until next year. The Tiny1 hardware itself is still in the finalization stages in regard to design, and as it's TinyMOS’s first hardware device, the company's December 2016 shipping estimate is probably optimistic. A demo of the TinyMOS software is already available on the Play Store, and shows off some of the augmented reality software features of the camera.