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iFrogz designed five new wireless headphones to withstand being tossed in your bag

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iFrogz

iFrogz recognizes that most people aren't taking good care of their headphones, earbuds, or neckbuds. We put these gadgets through hell, and unless we're spending hundreds of dollars on them, we're also not cleaning them frequently or even really taking care to not twist their wires. Today, the company is introducing five new pairs of Bluetooth-connected headphones that all cost below $40. The line includes earbuds (not truly wireless), neckbuds, and on-ear headphones.

The most expensive devices are the Resound Wireless earbuds and the Resound Wireless Headphones. Both cost $34.99. You can see them pictured here:

Both are clearly designed to be somewhat stylish. The earbuds come in a charcoal or rose gold while the headphones are available in red or black. The headphones are flexible, so you can twist the headband any way, similarly to the V-Moda Crossfade 2 Wireless. You can't fold them, though. Still, iFrogz tells me they're designed to be thrown in a bag. They charge over microUSB and should last up to 20 hours. I appreciate that the iFrogz symbol isn't very obvious on the black pair I have here in The Verge's office, but they also sit uncomfortably on my head because of my glasses.

Meanwhile, the Resound Wireless earbuds are tiny and include a magnetic clip that can be used to secure the earbuds to your clothes or for cable management when they're in your bag. I haven't had a chance to wear them yet, but they really are tiny, and the rose gold aluminum looks expensive, even if Apple has sentenced the color to death. The earbuds should last for 10 hours and also charge over microUSB.

I'm not surprised these wireless headphones don't include support for a companion iOS or Android app. That adds cost, although customized sound and noise cancellation, both of which require an app, is where the industry is heading features-wise. Sony's new truly wireless earbuds, for example, calibrate to a listener's ear and feature active noise cancellation. They also cost $199.99.

For now, just releasing affordable Bluetooth headphones is enough it seems, as I can imagine iPhone 7 and above owners scrambling to find something decent to buy in an airport. iFrogz sees an opportunity and is taking it. Skullcandy sells wireless headphones and earbuds, too, but those are slightly more expensive. The plastic Jib Wireless earbuds cost $29.99 while iFrogz' version costs $19.99.