clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Circuit Breaker

Smart wine aerator that lets you speed up decanting launches on Indiegogo

New, 5 comments

If you buy something from a Verge link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics statement.

Photo: Aveine

A couple months ago, we got a chance to try out Aveine’s Smart Wine Aerator — a strange nozzle you can put on top of a wine bottle that exposes the wine to different amounts of air as you pour, depending on how much you want to open up the flavor. We got to test it on some extremely cheap and bad wine that was being handed out for free at a trade show, and the Aerator, to my surprise, actually worked. It turned an undrinkable wine into one that was, at least, drinkable.

Now, Aveine has launched a campaign to crowdfund production of its Aerator on Indiegogo. The campaign launched yesterday and has already surpassed its $30,000 goal. Depending on how early you back, you’ll be able to get an Aerator for somewhere under $200; when the campaign is over, Aveine plans to sell them for $249. It intends to start deliveries in September and send most units out in November.

There are plenty of traditional wine aerators out there that mimic the decanting process as you pour. But Aveine’s Aerator is supposed to take that to another level by allowing you to dial in exactly how much you want to open up the flavor. The gadget lets you choose how many hours of decanting you’d like to mimic, from minutes up to 24 hours, and the aerator exposes the wine to more or less air depending on what you select. A companion app will help owners figure out the right amount of time for any given bottle.

I’m not sure how precise of a flavor match you’ll get by pouring through Aveine’s Aerator instead of properly leaving the wine out to decant for hours. But it in the demo we got in January, it was clear to me that the Aerator was at least doing something to improve the flavor of the wine. That said, I don’t know how much better of an effect it has than a $20 wine aerator you can already buy at a store. It’s a nice idea, but I’d still recommend waiting until actual wine experts weigh in on its effectiveness and accuracy.

As with all crowdfunding campaigns, keep in mind that there’s a risk if you choose to back it, as the product still isn’t complete. Aveine indicated to us that development was largely finished and that if a product issue were to come up, it would be during the production process, which is what it’s gone to Indiegogo to fund. “So now, hopefully there shouldn’t be any hurdle to overcome,” one of the company’s engineer’s said.