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Apple’s second-gen Pencil is $20 off at Woot

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Supported by the USB-C iPad Pros and the 2020 iPad Air

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Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

The second-generation Apple Pencil, released in 2018, that can magnetically attach to the iPad Pro and iPad Air tablets that feature USB-C ports is $20 off at Woot. It’s a relatively small discount on its usual $129 price, but it seems like the best deal on the stylus happening right now. Compared to the infamous first iteration that can only recharge by plugging into a Lightning port, endangering itself while also looking very silly, this one charges wirelessly through the side of the iPad Pro or Air. It also supports gesture controls on the side of the Apple Pencil.

Resident Evil Village was the biggest game released last week, and you can already get a hearty $15 discount on the Steam PC version through digital storefront Eneba. If you want to dive into the first-person horror title and, you know, see the tall lady, head to Eneba, click “Buy Now” on the page, then use the offer code VILLAGEMAYWKND to get the game for around $45.

Samsung’s Galaxy Buds Pro wireless earbuds are at a great price right now at Woot. Normally $200, you can get the black, violet, or silver-colored earbuds for $30 off that price. These come with a one-year warranty through Samsung. In The Verge’s review, Chris Welch said the Buds Pro “strike a great mix in terms of sound quality, active noise cancellation, and comfort” compared to the competition.

The Lectrofan white noise machine is one of my favorite pieces of technology that I bring on every trip away. The black model is $33.38 at Amazon, down from its usual $50 price (via 9to5Toys). If you’re someone who has relied on white noise apps on the phone, I highly suggest trying this instead. The Lectrofan doesn’t have any moving parts, unlike some other white noise machines. Instead, it has 20 built-in fan and white noise variations that don’t have an obvious loop cycle, so you probably won’t be able to hear where the cycle ends and begins again, which is a nitpick I have with many free white noise apps.