Microsoft now lets enterprise users recover corrupted or deleted files from the past 30 days

Image: Microsoft

Microsoft's newest OneDrive for Business feature lets users restore files from any point in time over the past 30 days. Files Restore, as Microsoft calls it, lets users review changes made to files over those 30 days, including who made changes and at what time. They can then revert the file back to any prior state. The feature starts rolling out today to OneDrive for Business users, and will also work for recovering user-deleted files as long as they remain in the Recycle Bin.

You can get an idea of what File Restore looks like here, timeline and all:

Image: Microsoft

It seems relatively intuitive with the file names laid out, the exact time and date they were modified, and a list of who accessed them. Microsoft suggests using this feature if files are infected with malware, or if they want to see who might be tampering with documents, which makes sense. I just wish this feature would come to regular, non-paying users.

Comments

took them long enough…jeez

there is no reason, absolutely none for a company like Microsoft that has a large cloud infrastructure and tons of software development resources that OneDrive cannot be the best cloud storage option for consumers and business. MS needs to step it up. Box and Dropbox are eating their lunch.

I disagree that anybody is eating Microsoft’s lunch in enterprise, especially not Box or Dropbox. Never forget Microsoft has this market pretty much to themselves, thanks to Office 365 and previous experience with the rest of the Microsoft stack (Exchange, SharePoint, etc.). Small business, maybe.

This functionality has always existed for OneDrive and SharePoint, except it required opening a support ticket with Microsoft and specifying a last known good date. My company manages thousands of Office 365 customers and in every case we’ve found, Microsoft has been very quick to recover any files affected by ransomware on these customers’ OneDrive folders.

What they’ve done now is simply surface "the button" and make the feature available to all users so they can do this without contacting support.

Office 365 is a monopoly at this point. 140 users in total and growing very fast.

140 million I mean.

not really a monopoly, maybe a market leader. Google Apps has a significant share of the market as well and gives MS and O365 plenty of competition.

it’s not about talking Office 365.
I’m talking specifically about file sharing services. Despite MS bundling OneDrive into their O365 business packages, Enterprises with O365 are still choosing to go with Box for file sharing/storage because of their features, usability and security.

I should also add that OneDrive for Business and SharePoint Online both have had version control enabled by default for many years, so you could do per-file recovery of previous versions if you needed to. Comes in handy when a coworker borks an Excel file you’ve spent ages working on.

Box and Dropbox are eating their lunch.

Citation needed

Box is the standard as Enterprise solutions right now. Despite MS having an advantage of OneDrive coming bundled with Office365 suite, most Enterprises are still going with Box.

Dropbox has mind share of most consumers. Anecdotal, but most everyone knows what DropBox is and the same can’t be said of OneDrive.

Yeah, citation is still needed though.

Just a personal anecdote here. In my limited work experience, I have only seen DropBox used. Never heard of Box. People seem to know about OneDrive but, their companies were already committed to DropBox since like… many years ago.

Recovering deleted files was already possible since OneDrive offers several levels of trash bin functionality. The new features here is that you can recover your whole OneDrive content in one simple action, very useful in case of a full crypto-malware file curruption.

So the consumer OneDrive (1TB with O365 Home or Personal) still only supports versioning with Mirosoft Office files, and not all files?

View All Comments
Back to top ↑