Chrome 64 now trims messy links when you share them

Google’s latest consumer version of Chrome, version number 64, just started cleaning up messy referral links for you. Now, when you go to share an item, you’ll no longer see a long tracking string after a link, just the primary link itself, as spotted by Android Police.

This feature now happens automatically when sharing links in Chrome, either by the Share menu or by copying the link and pasting it elsewhere. Even though it slices off the extra bit of the URL, this doesn’t affect referral information. If you choose, you can copy and paste directly from the URL bar to grab the link in entirety.

Image: Android Police

As Android Police points out, while this is a useful feature, it does have a couple downsides, albeit nitpicky ones. For example, it eliminates anchor tags that will bring a user to a specific part within a longer article, so visiting a link that has been shared in Chrome will land you at the top of the page.

This is only one of many updates that has come with Chrome version 64. It also recently introduced automatic blocks for bad and unwanted ads that violate the Better Ads standards, the ability to mute entire sites that autoplay videos, and HDR support for Windows users.

Comments

I prefer using goo.gl https://goo.gl/ it keeps my history and is pretty short. I wish I could use the "goog.gl URL Shortener (Unofficial)" chrome extension on mobile It’s pretty awesome https://goo.gl/wKJkdf

though shorl.com is better if I need to pronounce it. Also, some apps don’t recognize gl as a tld.

Here’s one for you. I’ve been using this one for some time so I can use https://goo.gl from mobile

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.tdevaux.googleurlshortener

Surely one good reason for trimming the URL is to remove references to how the page was accessed. However might it also remove access past a paywall?

Handy extension for Chrome desktop users:
https://github.com/jparise/chrome-utm-stripper

(Strips Google Analytics (UTM) tokens from URL query strings)

What’s up with the iOS 5 cover image?

Stopped using Chrome as my main browser and havn’t looked back.

Whoa Chrome 64!
Is it a Nintendo exclusive?

Am confused, there have been URL shortening services for ages, inc Google’s own, so how is this different?

Its removing the referral information from the end of a URL when you copy it, so your copying the URL without any additional information / personal tracking info, instead of creating a short redirect.

So for example: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Xbox-One-Console-PLAYERUNKNOWNS-BATTLEGROUNDS/dp/B0792LNXD6/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?s=videogames&ie=UTF8&qid=8519141923&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=xbox+one&psc=1

Would become: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Xbox-One-Console-PLAYERUNKNOWNS-BATTLEGROUNDS/dp/B0792LNXD6/

How are we supposed to know that a URL has tracking referrer information if we don’t see it?

I can see where sharing a link that is intended for a certain person gets shared and visitors end up at a page that is later taken down or something.

Google is really turning out to be an Internet anti-competitive modern little Microsoft!

They have now established a pattern for roguishly overtaking the ability for other web businesses to track (or do referrals like here) whenever they have something to do with it.

A few year ago they started replacing externally-embedded images (e.g. for email tracking) in the subject of emails in people’s Gmail inboxes with their own google server-hosted hijacked images instead – literally modifying your email that you sent to someone! https://www.adestra.com/blog/gmail-image-changes-affect-email-open-tracking-messagefocus-fix/

(Is that even technically legal? Maybe they have a right to modify an email that comes TO their users inbox…oh well.)

THEY want all the tracking pie, and NOT their competitors if they can do something about it. They want to shoehorn everyone into adwords and adsense and whatever they do and benefit from.

I think it’s getting to Microsoft-levels of anti-competition now. Maybe some major business or org will sue them at some point if it hasn’t happened already?

They’re a browser, an OS, a web service (ALL the web services), and even an ISP, literally owning the entire chain. I think it’s getting out of hand.

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