Adobe will reportedly bring the full Photoshop to the iPad

Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge

Last year’s release of iOS 11 from Apple was all about turning the iPad into a full-fledged PC, but there remained a set of core desktop apps that were still stubbornly off Apple’s mobile platform, the full-fat version of Photoshop being key among them. Today, however, a report from Bloomberg reveals that Adobe is working on correcting that omission. Adobe is said to be planning to announce the release of the full version of Photoshop for the iPad in October of this year and to release the app in 2019. The company’s Scott Belsky, chief product officer for Creative Cloud, confirmed the cross-platform edition of Photoshop, though not the timeline of its release.

Adobe already offers a multiplicity of photo and imaging apps for iOS, including a simplified Photoshop Express. None of these mobile versions have quite lived up to the level of quality and flexibility of the company’s PC and Mac apps, which has left room for mobile-focused competitors like Affinity Photo to garner a share of the market. Bloomberg describes the decision to release the full Photoshop on the iPad as a change of strategy for Adobe, which is increasingly looking to entice hobbyists and casual users as well as image-editing professionals. Belsky is quoted as saying there’s been great demand from Photoshop users for the ability to make “edits on the fly,” which is what this Photoshop release will try to sate.

Comments

Another reason why the iPad should get a trackpad. Maybe there’ll be an iPad event next year where they introduce iPad-specific iOS features, Photoshop and trackpad support. Fingers crossed.

Entire touchscreen not enough? I think I understand the docked scenario that you have in mind, but that partially defeats the point of the iPad as an ultra-mobile device and it’s also the sort of situation where I’d be content using a mouse as the external peripheral. Do you use the Magic Trackpad with your desktop Mac, perchance?

Mouse support in general is sorely needed in the iPad IMO. I want to be able to work in Powerpoint and I need a mouse (selecting objects and drawing boxes using finger or pencil – no thanks).

The "big 3" productivity applications are Photoshop, Microsoft Office and Google Chrome.
Now that Adobe is bringing full-fat Photoshop to the iPad, will Apple update iWork to the "full" versions too? (Obviously Microsoft is not ready to give the iPad full version of Office).

Full Google Chrome with its extensions model can’t work for iOS but perhaps Apple can update Safari to give it a little extensions ecosystem?

iPad with mouse support (using bluetooth mice) would really get it much closer to competing with laptops.

Extensions in Safari are very handy, like LastPass. That Chrome can’t use those + not select it as default browser makes me use Safari.

I’m a dev so I depend on structured foldrr bookmarks. Only way basically is to import once in a while my bookmarks from Chrome to Safari on my MacBook OTG dev PC so they sync to Safari on iOS. Luckily Safari on desktop lets one easily import Chrome bookmarks (and history if wanted)!

Mouse support in general is sorely needed in the iPad

The generations raised on touchscreens are as fast or faster on them than us old boots with a mouse on the Mac. I’ve seen some guys using Garageband on the iPad like I’ve never used Logic (and I use Logic since V3).

It’s a paradigm change that’s only starting to unfold now.

You are right on the money. My son couldn’t care less for a mouse.

Just because you’re slow at getting around with a mouse and keyboard, doesn’t mean the rest of us are.

There is no way you’re getting tasks done faster across the board on a touch-based device with no mouse support.

Additional inputs only expand the possibility of a more efficient workflow.

There is no way you’re getting tasks done faster across the board on a touch-based device with no mouse support.

That just proves you are on the slow side too. We welcome you.

Desktop OS’s are much faster for getting just about anything done, it’s not only the input method since they’re not limited to one type of input.

If touch was superior, perhaps would be seeing it as the primary input method on all productivity-based setups? There’s a good reason why we don’t.

I get you may have a preference, but it’s not more efficient at this stage. Not even close.

I am the desktop-and-mouse guy too.

But we are legacy, like when the world moved from command line to GUI interfaces. The arguments against were the same as now, check it out.

The touch first paradigm is inevitable. We are in the middle of the transition.

You may be right and I may be way off base.

But I’m not legacy. I don’t rely on any one input method and I use them all daily.

I also don’t use a stylus to browse the internet or edit video. It’s about the right input depending on the task. Touch has never been the most effective way of getting everything done, that’s why a desktop setup has ruled and continues to do so.

Maybe some substantial interface changes will come along and, using voice and touch, we’ll be able to do things faster. I don’t see how you can reasonably see anyone beating out keyboard shortcuts and a mouse for anything technical. Touch can be supplemental, but not primary. IMO

I’d also note that the command line interface didn’t completely die off either. It’s still used by some number of power users, and I’d expect something similar of mouse based interfaces.

Sorry, but there are a lot of things that are faster on a touch screen, including video editing.

I disagree… SOME editing tasks work just fine with touchscreen, others with mouse, and some, your feet. There’s no one best tool at all times.

Seriously, adding a foot pedal to your editing workflow really helps, as it frees up your hands to do other things for the job.

For example: Foot pedal for Razor + right hand for selecting track(s) to razor + left hand on backspace key…depending on the pace, and your familiarity with tools and footage, you can edit a multicamera music shoot in real time (or faster), and using your foot is pretty natural for getting the beat.

Long story short – use the best tools for the job.

I disagree… SOME editing tasks work just fine with touchscreen, others with mouse, and some, your feet. There’s no one best tool at all times.

You disagree, and then qualify it with a statement that doesn’t at all represent what I said. I never said everything was faster, and obviously it depends on what a person is familiar with and prefers.

You might want to reread what you wrote. Of course I qualify my statement because blanket statements like yours are, IMHO (and usually demonstrably), wrong.

Sorry, but there are a lot of things that are faster on a touch screen, including video editing.

In that (and other comments in the thread) you are coming from a POV that there is one input method superior to all others, at all tasks.

If that isn’t your intention, then you’re not expressing yourself clearly.

Now let’s take a look at what I wrote again. In my example, one could easily replace the mouse functions with touch (or stylus), and still complete task at hand more quickly and intuitively than touch (or mouse) alone.

I humbly suggest that your proselytizing for one input method over all others is clouding any semblance of rationality.

A lot of things that don’t involve anything technical, sure.

What a silly thing to say. Editing multiple streams of 4k is quite "technical". What does the input method have to do with the level of technicality? That literally makes zero sense.

Is it?

Editing 4K on a touch-based device is going to take more time and effort than it would with a mouse and keyboard and a capable OS.

I’ve been editing video, graphics, and 3D for too long to know there’s just now no way you’re doing the same things faster on a touch-based device like the iPad becuase it lacks the advantages of precise and fast input methods.

Editing 4K on a touch-based device is going to take more time and effort than it would with a mouse and keyboard and a capable OS.

Wrong, especially with the pencil. It’s faster and more intuitive.

Change is scary, I know.

Gorilla arming it on the iPad for hours is a shitty experience vs working on the same project with a mouse. It’s just a fact.

Tablets weren’t the sole future, they’re just another device that excells at consumption. This is the current change, you’re welcome to join us from 2009. Change can be scary I know.

I have no idea what you’re talking about. I don’t want tablets to be the "sole future". That is Microsoft’s strategy, not mine. I have a desktop, laptop, and a tablet. They each excel at different things, and I wouldn’t want to be without any of them. One of my favorite things to do on a tablet is video editing. It is very fast, easy and intuitive. And no, there is no "gorilla arming" involved. I put it at a slight angle and use the Pencil, which is highly precise.

If you don’t want to edit video on a tablet, don’t. But don’t tell me it it’s a bad experience because I know firsthand that it’s a great experience.

Using the pencil is not "touch" which means finger(s)

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