Here are the 2019 Hugo Award nominees

Photo by Andrew Liptak / The Verge
If you buy something from a Verge link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics statement.

The nominees for the 2019 Hugo Awards were announced by the 2019 Dublin World Science Fiction Convention, and they represent the best speculative fiction that was published in the last year.

Named for Amazing Stories editor Hugo Gernsback and awarded since 1953, the awards are one of speculative fiction’s biggest prizes. They are administered by the World Science Fiction Society, and they’re selected by members of the World Science Fiction Convention (known as Worldcon).

Last year, author N.K. Jemisin made history when she earned her third consecutive Best Novel award for her book The Stone Sky (the third installment of her Broken Earth trilogy). She is the first author to ever do so. Other winners included Martha Wells, for her Murderbot novella All Systems Red, Suzanne Palmer for her novelette The Secret Life of Bots, and Rebecca Roanhorse for her short story Welcome to your Authentic Indian Experience™.

Nominees this year are a diverse range of authors, including Mary Robinette Kowal, Rebecca Roanhorse, Catherynne M. Valente, Martha Wells, and three writers whose works were part of The Verge’s Better Worlds science fiction project: Kelly Robson, Rivers Solomon, and Justina Ireland. Several of the works included, such as Artificial Condition, The Black God’s Drums, The Calculating Stars, Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach, Spinning Silver, and Trail of Lightning, were also present on this year’s Nebula Awards ballot.

The 2019 Hugo Awards will be handed out at this year’s WorldCon 77, which will be held in Dublin, Ireland, between August 15th and 19th. Here is the full list of nominees for this year’s awards. Links have been added for our reviews and related coverage or where stories are available online.

BEST NOVEL

BEST NOVELLA

BEST NOVELETTE

BEST SHORT STORY

BEST SERIES

BEST RELATED WORK

BEST GRAPHIC STORY

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION – LONG FORM

BEST DRAMATIC PRESENTATION – SHORT FORM

BEST EDITOR – SHORT FORM

BEST EDITOR – LONG FORM

BEST PROFESSIONAL ARTIST

BEST SEMIPROZINE

BEST FANZINE

BEST FANCAST

BEST FAN WRITER

BEST FAN ARTIST

Best Art Book

2018 ASSOCIATED AWARDS (NOT HUGOS)

JOHN W. CAMPBELL AWARD FOR BEST NEW WRITER

THE LODESTAR AWARD FOR BEST YOUNG ADULT BOOK

Comments

I keep trying these hugo novels and I keep falling asleep on them. This award feels about like the Academy awards where you people are making movies just for the awards.

I read most of the nominees this year, I thought they were all good. Revenant Gun is science fiction at its mindbending best. I hope it wins. Give it a shot if you haven’t.

Also I normally stick with the SF side of SF/F, and am kind of tired of retellings/adaptations of fairy tales, but I happened to read Novik’s Spinning Silver and found the tight plotting pretty compelling.

Any novel, novella, or novelette (lol?) that gets Hugo nominated, or, heaven forfend, wins a Hugo is not going to be one of the best. The only place the Hugo has any real relevance left is dramatic presentations, and it’s still missing some of the best projects.

All of these extraneous categories just water down to award’s cachet and they can’t even manage to nominate the best books so I’m not sure why they keep bothering.

The novel/novella/novelette categories are pretty much as old as the award. (They break down as follows: Novel, 40k words; novella; 17k-40k; novellette, 7.5k-17.5kl short story, 3,500k-7500k.)

I don’t think anyone in Hollywood really pays attention to the Hugos, but I’d argue that the novella / novelette categories have some good opportunities when it comes to online reading and audio formats, given the changes in reader / listener behaviors in the last decade or so.

Yep, I know how the Hugos used to be a mark of excellent work in novel, novella, and short story. I can’t remember any novelette winners (I mean, I’m sure I remember the stories, just not the awards).

I doubt anyone in Hollywood cares about Hugos, just like they don’t care about their own science fiction/horror/fantasy awards (the Saturns).

The problem is that 25 years ago being a Hugo award nominee or winner meant this was some of the best work in the field. Now it doesn’t mean anything at all. In fact, for me it’s beginning to be a signal I should avoid the work.

To quote myself:

If you want awards that actually recognize the best in the field, the Arthur C. Clarke awards for British-centric authors, and the British Fantasy Awards and World Fantasy Awards more broadly.
Most US-run and US-centric awards aren’t worth your time or attention due to being hijacked by domestic political struggles, with the Philip K. Dick Award being a notable exception.

I used to do the same then after years of trying I just concluded that the people who vote for the Hugo Awards have a different taste in books than I do. I always do take a look at the nominees for best novel but rarely do any of them interest me.

Too many categories… Should put a warning for the "slow boring reads" for Negative9 and myself.

Those are what we folks over 35 call "novels", apparently?

Record of a Spaceborn Few was my least favorite of the Wayfarer series. I kept waiting for a story to really begin, and then the book was over. Space Opera was pretty fun. Still waiting for The Calculating Stars at my library.

Record of a Spaceborn Few was my least favorite of the Wayfarer series.

same. i feel like the 2nd two books are made of leftover ideas from the first book and if the author were to work on a story in a new universe, or just figure out a whole new starting point in the same universe, she could go somewhere pretty cool with the ability she’s shown.

Oh, I thought it was the strongest of the three! I really love that one.

The vast majority are female authors. Is this just a coincidence, the norm or a political gesture?

There may be a tiny bit of politics involved (there was that right wing campaign to dominate Hugo voting a few years ago) but mostly it just reflects that there are a lot more women authors in sci-fi/fantasy now and in fandom. And the Hugos mostly ignore the women who write genre-influenced romance novels so there’s a lot out there by women compared to just ten years ago.

A significant part of the problem is that nobody cares about the Hugos any more.

If you want awards that actually recognize the best in the field, the Arthur C. Clarke awards for British-centric authors, and the British Fantasy Awards and World Fantasy Awards more broadly.

Most US-run and US-centric awards aren’t worth your time or attention due to being hijacked by domestic political struggles, with the Philip K. Dick Award being a notable exception.

I think it’s a bit of the norm and internal politics within the SF/F community. The last couple of years have seen a lot more women being nominated, but I think that Amy Kat has the right point — there’s more of a push for recognition for works by women, but I think that at its base, there’s simply a lot of good works that are bubbling up. This year’s novel list is pretty fantastic. The ones that I’m bummed aren’t on there are Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett, Ball Lightning by Liu Cixin, and Semiosis, by Sue Burke. Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente, Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse, The Calculating Stars, by Mary Robinette Kowal, and Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers were all on my initial ballot.

Loved Spider-Man but Annihilation is flawless.

I just recently finished the Broken Earth trilogy (that won N.K. Jemisin those last three Hugo’s), after not really ‘reading’ for a long time, and it blew my mind, i loved it. I listened to it as audiobooks, and the performance was also incredible.

Where "The Gone World" by Tom Sweterlitsh?! "Big Damn Hero" by James Lovegrove???

I nominated The Gone World, but I didn’t get the impression that it was super popular within the SFF community. It was marketed more as a mainstream thriller.

I don’t know that tie-in stories have ever been nominated, but Big Damn Hero wouldn’t be something that I’d nominate. It was fun, but kind of forgettable.

View All Comments
Back to top ↑