Samsung will mark replacement Note 7 devices with a blue S on the box

Samsung is nearly ready to begin shipping a new batch of Galaxy Note 7 devices that don't suffer from the "isolated battery cell issues" that led to a worldwide recall just one week ago. When the replacements are received by customers and retailers over the next couple weeks, the Note 7 box will be clearly marked to indicate that the battery inside is safe. You'll see a small black box on the white barcode label, but the more obvious identifier will be a circular sticker with a blue S in the middle. It'll look something like this:


That'll make it easier to distinguish which Note 7s don't pose a risk when you're looking at the packaging, but what if you've only got the phone itself? Samsung isn't making any changes to the Note 7's physical design. Instead, it'll be launching an IMEI database tool next week where consumers can type in their phone's unique IMEI number and see whether it's an original, recalled note or one of the safe replacement shipments. The IMEI can be found on the Note 7's barcode label, but you can also view it on the device itself by going to the settings menu.

Buyers of the original Note 7 should be able to exchange the device for a replacement model wherever it was originally purchased. Following the recall, mobile carriers have also offered full refunds on the Note 7 and waived all restocking fees. In most cases, customers also have the option of trading it for a Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge and being credited the difference in cost.


Samsung Galaxy Note 7 review

Comments

Might as well put GG4 on it while they are at it.

That was fast.

Lol well when your phone is blowing up Jeeps and not allowed on airlines it better damn well be fast

The idea with the label was fast, but not actual replacements. Of course, 2.5 million is nearly order of magnitude less number than what Apple would have to deal with in a similar case, but it is still millions of phones. Samsung can not just pull them out of the hat in a week; it will take some time.

Not talking about the label, I’m just going off this:

Samsung is nearly ready to begin shipping a new batch of Galaxy Note 7 devices that don’t suffer from the "isolated battery cell issues" that led to a worldwide recall just one week ago. When the replacements are received by customers and retailers over the next couple weeks, the Note 7 box will be clearly marked to indicate that the battery inside is safe.

They had to get new batteries, test them because they don’t want a second eff up, and then produce the phones…so a couple off weeks is pretty fast for that to happen.

Or the other option. There were already some indications internally the batteries might have a problem but the voices inside were drowned out by the ship ship ship ship crowd (or the people who honestly didn’t believe there was a real issue). Think O-Rings on the space shuttle.

In this case, there may have been a team already working down some of these paths.

I doubt Samsung’s testing sample size was ever big enough to detect a fire. If there were 35 out of 2,000,000 incidents before the recall, that’s 1 in >50,000.

There were 2.5 million units that had been moved to the retailers, but only 1 M of them were bought by customers. The number of exploded phones are over 40 now, and counting even a week after the recall. So the ratio is about 1 in 25,000. Probably these batteries exploded after being charged less than 20 times in total.
If Samsung followed industry standards and tested these batteries thousands of times, they would certainly see a much greater fail ratio. Apparently, they were more concerned about releasing the phone before the iPhone event.

that’s a big assumption, considering they released the Note 7 52 weeks after the Note 5

It doesn’t take forever to conduct stress testing

Not really since the affected batteries were sourced from a subcontractor and I’m sure they had more of the unaffected batteries that were going into new phones. It’s quite simple to isolate your stock that were made with the batteries from the subcontractor and to only ship already assembled phones with the batteries that were not bad. So it’s not that hard to believe that they can ship enough to fill those ordered via the pre-order and for those folks who bought them on launch day and until they were removed from sale. The number of those was about 400k .. and that number has been published in a quite a few places. So they replace those and carry on making new phones with the unaffected battery. It will probably take a while until they go back on sale generally.

I haven’t seen this info. Do you have a source? (Thinking about getting a Note 7 after the recall)

We know that the affected batteries come from a single subcontractor, look it up yourself. So just get the leftover batteries from the other subcontractors.

Two week is when the first such phone will be delivered, not 2.5 million of them. So whole replacement will take a while, indeed.

Hmm, so the Note 7S.

Maybe the Sfire edition, eSploded?

trying too hard

Yeah, you’re trying to hard. But those a day late and a dollar short usually do try to hard.

jesus thats shitty writing in its fullest form

The FAA note this morning was brutal. Good on sammy for doing the right thing.

Yes, but they did not really have a choice. Otherwise the government could issue a regulation that those devices are hazardous and ban them on the federal level, and this could happen in many countries. Let alone possible lawsuits.

They could have gone the route of many "hover"board manufacturers and waiting until their hand was forced. They did not.

I assure you that Samsung did not WANT to have to recall their flagship phones. The fact that they did as soon as they identified a possible issue is actually something positive. Why you’re trying to turn it into a negative is beyond my understanding.

They saw the severity of the issue, and did not want to get fined and banned from selling those phones. Also didn’t want to get sued for killing their users. It wasn’t a choice, it was a necessity.

I never said it wasn’t a necessity. The speed at which they did it was the positive aspect. Make no mistake, not every manufacturer would have done it as quickly.

Make no mistake, not every manufacturer would have done it as quickly.

I’m not sure I believe that. With the amount of competition in the mobile phone industry, anything less can easily lead to the end of a given company’s brand.

Sorry but Samsung did the unthinkable a recall it’s money making flagship. Try doing that with Apples thinking: Your charging it wrong.

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