Philips releases a headband that plays white noise to help you sleep

Image: Philips
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Philips just came out with a new headband that plays white noise to help your brain get to sleep.

Although Philips’ headband looks like an ill-formed diaper, its weird design attaches built-in sensors to your forehead in order to detect brain activity. Then it shares that data with a connected mobile app. When deep sleep is detected, the headband’s speakers will start playing white noise in a slowly repeating pattern, which Philips claims will reinforce a good night’s sleep.

A startup announced a similarly strange-looking headband called Dreem built for the same purpose of playing white noise as you sleep last June, and it’s currently on sale for a hefty $499.

While the Philips headband doesn’t look that comfortable or reliable, small pilot studies on the effect of noise on deep sleep have suggested that it might help older adults achieve better sleep and stronger memory. But since those studies are in really small groups, the findings may not hold up.

What we do know is that sleep is important, and according to a 2016 CDC report, one in three adults in the US don’t get enough of it. Is it worth wearing an expensive, diaper-looking contraption every night to bed? That’s debatable.

The Philips SmartSleep headband will be available this spring in the US, and it will cost $399.99, which at least is cheaper than Dreem.

Comments

Interesting design. I wonder if it could be combined with possible treatments for tinnitus.

I have pretty bad tinnitus, which is what made me click on the article. musician parents, and 20 years playing music myself, has destroyed my ears. White noise machines and apps are amazing for those times you can’t remove your focus from it.

1.) This product does NOT play white noise (the article is 100% incorrect)
2.) The tones are generated during specific points of N3 Deep Sleep, which increases the Delta power spectrum during that time, and increases the restorative effect.

As a sufferer of sleep apnea I would love to see this tech built into their masks. It’s hard enough sleeping with a mask, if some white noise can get you there and keep you asleep then that would be most welcomed!

Also, for anyone out there who suspects they don’t get enough sleep or can’t sleep – go and have a sleep study done, it’s so worth it!

It really does suck man, I have to sleep with headphones on just to fall asleep then I wake up with neckpain due to headphones but if I don’t use machine I get headaches and even worse I’ll risk having an AFib event

Huh? What’s wrong with a pair or earbuds? Heck. A common speaker can give you white noise. The 35 Amazon echo can do it, no prob. Another dud.

"Alexa read my brainwaves and play white noise in sync"? Right

1.) This doesn’t play white noise; the article is incorrect.
2.) The tones are played during specific points of N3 deep sleep to enhance the Delta power spectrum during that time, increasing the restorative effect.

Your brain needs less light and noise – not more – to sleep deeply. Dreamhelmet triple-action sleep-mask sound reducing pillow is made specifically for that.

Wrong. Those of us with serious tinnitus struggle to sleep without white noise.

However, you are correct about light and noise in general. I have the f.lux app for my desktop, the Twilight app for my phone, and Philips Hue lights that automatically sync with the sunset that dim to orange at night and become a bright white during the day – I sleep far better than I ever have before, but without my fan blowing, I wouldn’t be able to. The ringing in my ears is too strong otherwise.

The article is incorrect. This product does *not play white noise.

It’s an expensive solution when there are far cheaper ways of doing it. Just get a white noise machine https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_1_11?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=white+noise+machine

you can download a free app too. life is about different choices or maybe this will allow your partner not to hear it etc.

1.) This product does NOT play white noise (the article is 100% incorrect)
2.) The tones are generated during specific points of N3 Deep Sleep, which increases the Delta power spectrum during that time, and increases the restorative effect.

This article is 100% incorrect.@Shannon_Liao, please do your homework before you post incorrect articles with pretty pictures.

1.) This product does NOT play white noise.
2.) This product does NOT play pink noise, and the related Pilot Studies are entirely irrelevant to this decades-studied science.
3.) This topic is heavily researched. Search Google for "Audio Slow Wave Enhancement".
4.) The tones are generated during specific points of N3 Deep Sleep, which increases the Delta power spectrum during that time, and increases the restorative effect.

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