Totally real actor who plays Roy Kent responds to conspiracy theory that he is CGI

You want me to believe this is flesh and blood? Absolutely not, but they did a great job with the fabric effects.
Image: Apple

Update, September 2nd, 12:03PM ET: The “actor” Brett Goldstein has addressed the conspiracy theory that Ted Lasso’s Roy Kent is a CGI creation head-on by publishing a statement on Instagram. In it, Goldstein notes (quite accurately) that “there’s a fucking load of mad shit happening on the internet today, as usual” before reassuring viewers that he is “a completely real normal human man” who does “normal human basic things like rendering and buffering and transferring data.” Glad to have that sorted out. (The original story follows below.)

I’ll confess this upfront: I’ve yet to watch an episode of Ted Lasso. But I absolutely buy the conspiracy theory that one of the show’s main characters, Roy Kent, is a CGI creation.

People on Reddit have apparently been talking about this for months, but after their discussion was shared on Twitter this week, the theory about the Apple TV Plus show has gone mainstream. I read some of the threads, googled some screenshots of Kent himself (or itself), and I have to agree: the man looks like he stepped straight out of FIFA 21.

When I broached the subject in The Verge’s Slack, a number of colleagues said they’d already had this exact discussion with friends. “I have thought this since ep 1 and i did not know it was a thing other people thought!” said one, before sharing screencaps of a group chat on the subject, which devolved into a discussion about how furry Kent is.

None of us could put our fingers on exactly why Roy (who is “played” by “actor” Brett Goldstein) looks so uncanny, but we settled on the following factors:

And in fairness, TV shows and films are blurring the line between CGI and human actors more than ever nowadays. Think about the appearance of a de-aged Princess Leia in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story or (SPOILER ALERT) Luke Skywalker at the end of the second season of The Mandalorian. Nvidia even did a recent press conference, which included a CGI version of the company’s CEO, Jensen Huang (though only for a single, brief shot).

So, yeah, Roy Kent is CGI, I buy it! Why not? For good measure, I’m going to start believing that my boss, family, and close friends are all CGI as well. Maybe one day I’ll be able to join them. At least if I was computer-generated, my beard would look better.

Comments

My kids actually walked in one day and said, "are you playing FIFA?"

I think the biggest factor is the fact that he maintains the same facial expression the entire time.

My kids actually walked in one day and said, "are you playing FIFA?"

No they didn’t.

Not sure why that’s so unbelievable, but it really did happen.

There’s next to no actual football in Ted Lasso that makes it unbelievable.

It was a locker room scene, actually. Super weird thing to be skeptical of.

They have locker room scenes in FIFA?

There’s been a Story Mode with cutscenes for 3 years straight, from FIFA17 to 19…

r/ThatHappened

No they did not , they’re definitely smarter than you

OMG thank you. I just couldn’t figure out what was weird about ‘him’.

He’s just a late career Roy Keane.

But less angry

Everyone is sell angry than Keano

The internet was in fact, a mistake

I feel like this season of Ted Lasso is one of the very best arguments for streaming platforms to just put all the episodes of a season up at once (you know, how we all were introduced to streaming television in the first place, the key feature in pulling everyone into Netflix and entrenching it as THE leader in the market – which it still is!) and to let people watch the show for the show and not to devalue the show at the expense of promoting "the discourse" for a couple hundred thousand assholes who learned nary a single lesson from the perpetually disappointed fandoms that ruined LOST, Battlestar, Game of Thrones, WandaVision, etc. etc., on and on, for themselves.

I feel like Ted Lasso became a legitimate thing because word of mouth drove people to it after all the episodes were already up, and people watched it at their own pace, usually two or three episodes at a time (or, in my case, five episodes one day, five episodes the next)

And now, this season, its’ been turned into cheap grist for the content grift mill, to the benefit of NOTHING and NOBODY, and a show as sweet-natured and generally positive as TED FUCKING LASSO is just as poisonous and stupid and ugly to interact with as any given Star Trek or Star Wars "conversation" in that community, conversations regularly about as fun as watching a snail crawl along the edge of a straight razor.

And now, this season, its’ been turned into cheap grist for the content grift mill, to the benefit of NOTHING and NOBODY, and a show as sweet-natured and generally positive as TED FUCKING LASSO is just as poisonous and stupid and ugly to interact with as any given Star Trek or Star Wars "conversation" in that community, conversations regularly about as fun as watching a snail crawl along the edge of a straight razor.

I know I shouldn’t be but I am legit confused as to how there can even be a "fandom" around Ted Lasso. The show is excellent and it deserves all the fans it has earned. But like, what is there to discuss about the show after it’s over? People are certainly allowed to do what they want but it’s not like the show is trying to pose some complicated mystery that people need to piece together each week.

Like, what are they even talking about between episodes? Or is that the issue and the reason why you’re seeing people being toxic because they have to invent content to discuss?

Hmmmm, maybe whether or not a main character is fake!

I think it boils down to which side of the atlantic you live on.

If I actually knew anyone else in the UK that watched it I’d be debating where AFC Richmond sit in the premier league of fictional football teams consisting of such legendary sides as Renford Rejects, Glipton Grasshoppers, Harchester United, Earls Park FC and Leddesford Town.

Yeah agreed. I think the way bigger issue is that this guy is somewhere on the internet where people are arguing about Ted Lasso? Like Jesus, what the shit haha. Ted lasso is a piece of candy. You eat it, feel warm and fuzzy, and then continue your life.

Also that response came out of left field in response to the internet was in fact a mistake so I’m amused by the response all around. Granted I’m still on Season 1 so maybe it’s an inside joke I haven’t got to but still.

I doubt it’s about the discourse. It keeps people subscribed so they don’t just take one month’s subscription and finish the entire show. Apple TV+ in particular is in this situation right now where you can genuinely finish everything they have well within a month’s time. So then they do this bullshit to keep your subscription running.

Apple doesn’t care about "the discourse" it’s just so you don’t cancel your subscription immediately after binging Ted lasso. But I agree, first season felt better watching all the way through at once.

I get this argument but… people can (and do) do that anyway! People will also just wait to subscribe on a month when everything is already there to watch, too! And (and I’d bet this is the most frequent) people subscribe and then forget they’re even subscribing so it just keeps rolling over in the background, so whether a show is currently running or not is completely beside the point. They’ll just get to it whenever anyway. So the only actual benefit is, again – the discourse. The free marketing that a couple hundred thousand people on social media crawling up each others asses week-to-week ostensibly provides them.

And it’s dumb! It’s a dumb reason to apply broadcast scheduling to streaming platforms. But it’s what so many of these executives (and creators – and audiences) are used to, so they insist on doing it, and we insist on pointing to this (non) excuse to justify it, because we’re ALSO used to it. At one point we were so used to it that when given the option to watch at our own speed, whenever and however we wanted, we jumped at it because it was better that way, as it turns out

Again: the whole reason everyone’s in this space is because the industry leader DOESN’T DO WEEK to WEEK, and gave users the option to watch whatever, whenever, without worrying about whether they’ll cancel because a single show on their library isn’t running week to week.

(The "but spoilers" argument usually also gets brought up but that’s just a variation on the "discourse" itself, and also – that’s a personal problem, not a platform one. If you want to watch week-to-week on your own schedule, that’s the user’s choice! You can do that. You just can’t do that and then also expect to swan onto the internet at large and have throngs of people keep you spoiler free, either. But then again, maybe the value in watching a show shouldn’t be so closely tied to your ability to talk about it in front of other people, either.)

As I said above there obviously is a financial strategy involved but I also think it’s wring to discount the benefits of allowing a discussion and critical evaluation to happen over a several week period rather than several days. Hell, the entire "recap" industry is pretty much ruined for binge dumps. Why WOULDN’T Apple (or any other streaming service that isn’t Netflix) actively want a weekly discussion and several major outlets hosting weekly forums on their shows?

I also think it’s wring to discount the benefits of allowing a discussion and critical evaluation to happen over a several week period rather than several days. Hell, the entire "recap" industry is pretty much ruined for binge dumps. Why WOULDN’T Apple (or any other streaming service that isn’t Netflix) actively want a weekly discussion and several major outlets hosting weekly forums on their shows?

1) Why should there even be a "recap industry?" Honestly, it’s arguable that there’s still even such a thing (it’s basically just Vulture and AV Club still doing it to any serious degree. Everyone else gave up on it about 3-4 years ago) and the use it provided is long since toast. The idea that such an industry deserves to survive doesn’t make any sense to me. It’s not really providing any value, which is borne out by the fact only two mainstream (-ish) sites still even bother to do them.

2) What are the benefits of a "critical evaluation" (said eval being done by non-critics for the most part, and people who don’t even really know how to apply critical thought) spread out week to week as opposed to being done after-the-fact, when the whole can be judged as such? The only possible benefit I can honeslty spot is "free marketing" and again – I can’t point to a single example of a fanbase being given so much power over a show’s marketing ending well for the show, or its creators. Fandoms ruin things, they don’t make them better.

Apple wouldn’t want week-to-week discourse because eventually that discourse becomes so fucking stupid that anyone seeing it would likely be disinclined to even try out the thing that’s turned these assholes on one another like rabid hyenas.

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